Michael Boele van Hensbroek

Michael Boele van Hensbroek, Professor of Global Child Health and paediatric infectious disease specialist, is a staff member of the Emma Children’s hospital, Academic Medical Centre of the University of Amsterdam. He previously worked in The Gambia (1991-1995), conducting randomized controlled trials on the treatment of severe malaria in children. The research was based at the MRC research laboratories and was part of collaboration between the University of Oxford and the University of Amsterdam. This was followed by a 5-year (1996-2000) training period in pediatrics. In 2000 he obtained a Wellcome Trust career development fellowship to study the aetiology, pathogenesis and outcome of severe anemia in Malawian children. During his fellowship he was based at the Wellcome Trust Research Laboratories in Blantyre, Malawi, conducting his research and working as a consultant in Pediatrics at Queens Elisabeth Central Hospital. In 2005 he (as P.I.) obtained a grand from the Dutch government to develop a Research Support Centre (RSC) at the University of Malawi and conduct a series of related intervention trials on severe anaemia prevention. In 2005 he returned to the Emma Children’s hospital to become the Head of the Global Child Health Group, pediatric advisor for Doctors Without Boarders (MSF) and to complete his training in Pediatric infectious diseases. In 2013 he was appointed Professor in Global Child Health at the University of Amsterdam. His is currently principle investigator of a € 2,8 million project of developing a network of RSC’s in Southern Africa in order to build local research capacity and of €1,0 million grant on studying the etiology of Nodding Syndrome in South Sudanese children. Finally he is co-principle investigator of a large program in Kwara state, Nigeria evaluating the impact of a health insurance system on maternal and child health. This program includes household surveys and randomized studies.

Publications

  • Long-term effects of HIV treatment in sub-Saharan Africa: from access to quality

    Authored by: T.S. Boender
    Thesis Universiteit van Amsterdam
    Promotor(s): T.F. Rinke de WitM. Boele van Hensbroek
    Copromotor(s): K.C.E. Sigaloff, J.C.J. Calis
    Date of thesis defense: 20/05/2016

    As HIV treatment programs in sub-Saharan Africa mature, there are rising concerns about the long-term sustainability and quality of these programs. Increasing levels of HIV drug resistance have been measured in sub-Saharan Africa, and could jeopardize long-term treatment success. This thesis presents the results of prospective cohort studies in adults and children, assessing the quality of HIV treatment programmes and the emergence of HIV drug resistance in sub-Saharan Africa. Read more. 

  • An Evaluation of Alternative Markers to Guide Initiation of Anti‑retroviral Therapy in HIV‑Infected Children in Settings where CD4 Assays are not Available

    Authored by: Huibers Minke H. W., Moons Peter, Maseko Nelson, Gushu Montfort B., Wit Ferdinand W., Graham Steve M., van Hensbroek Michael Boele, Calis Job C.
    In: JOURNAL OF TROPICAL PEDIATRICS 62(1), 2016, p.19‑28.
    http://tropej.oxfordjournals.org/content/62/1/19.abstract

  • Sequencing paediatric antiretroviral therapy in the context of a public health approach

    Authored by: Boerma Ragna S., Boender T. Sonia, Boele van Hensbroek Michael, Rinke de Wit Tobias F., Sigaloff Kim C. E. 
    In: JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL AIDS SOCIETY 18(7 Suppl 6), 2015, p.20265‑.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4670836/

  • Sequencing paediatric antiretroviral therapy in the context of a public health approach

  • An Evaluation of Alternative Markers to Guide Initiation of Anti-retroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Children in Settings where CD4 Assays are not Available.

    Authored by: Huibers MH, Moons P, Maseko N, Gushu MB, Wit F. W., Graham Susan M., Boele van Hensbroek M., Calis Job C. J.
    In: Journal of Tropical Medicine, 2015
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26491058

  • Burden and outcome of neonatal diseases and conditions at a rural district hospital setting in Kenya

    Authored by: Mwaniki M.K.
    Thesis Universiteit van Amsterdam
    Promotor(s): M. Boele van Hensbroek, C.R.J.C. Newton
    Copromotor(s): P.A. Kager
    Date of thesis defense: 08/10/2015

    Although the common causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality are known, there is paucity of information on many aspects that are required for effective management of neonates presenting for care in health facilities in low-incomesettings. In this thesis, I set to bridge this knowledge gap by looking at theneonatal admissions burden, assessing the ability of clinical signs to identify very ill neonates likely to die, examining the causes of infections among neonates, and describing the long-term post admission outcomes. Read more
  • The use of routine case record data to evaluate quality of inpatient hospital care for newborns and children in Kenya

    Authored by: Gathara D.N.
    Thesis Universiteit van Amsterdam
    Promotor(s): M. Boele van Hensbroek, M. English
    Date of thesis defense: 07/10/2015

    Quality of care assessment is one of the ways of evaluating what the health system is providing and can allow monitoring and evaluation exercises to track progress and identify gaps. Such monitoring however depends on an ability to measurequality with the availability of high quality data being central to these assessments. In low-resource settings routine health or hospital information system data are very limited, often of poor quality, and are typically summarized (e.g. total cases per ward) before being entered into the national health information system database. Read more

     

  • Assessing the epidemiological impact of extending the national influenza vaccination programme to healthy children in England

    Authored by: Helen Kay Green
    Thesis Universiteit van Amsterdam
    Promotor(s): M. Boele van Hensbroek
    Copromotor(s): N. Andrews, M. Baguelin
    Date of thesis defense: 10/09/2015

    Infection with influenza can result in significant morbidity and mortality each winter. The key strategy for control is vaccination and it was recently recommended to extend the routine programme in England to include healthychildren. The aim of this thesis is therefore to collate the intelligence on monitoring the population-level burden of influenza, uptake of the vaccine andepidemiological impact of the programme through routine surveillance systems. Read more
  • Exploring sources of variability in adherence to guidelines across hospitals in low-income settings: a multi-level analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 22 hospitals.

    Authored by: Gathara D., English M., Boele van Hensbroek M., Todd J., Allen E.
    In: Implementation Science, 2015
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25928803

  • The burden of schistosomiasis morbidity in African children: validating novel, low-cost and scalable detection tools and optimizing praziquantel treatment

    Authored by: Amaya Lopez Bustinduy
    Thesis Universiteit van Amsterdam
    Promotor(s): M. Boele van Hensbroek
    Copromotor(s): C.H. King, J.R. Storthard
    Date of thesis defense: 12/06/2015

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects over 100 million children in the world living mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. This thesis explored several aspects of the disease affecting the health of children from two African endemic countries: Kenya and Uganda. Epidemiological work revealed a worrisome association between schistosomiasis and malnutrition (both acute and chronic) as well as anaemia. A novel paediatric quality of life assessment was performed in children with the disease with a significant decrease in their psychosocial functioning. Read more