Hanneke Borgdorff

Hanneke Borgdorff received her medical degree with honours in 2011 at the University of Leiden. Since 2012 she has been appointed as PhD student at AIGHD and the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam under supervision of Professor Janneke van de Wijgert of the University of Liverpool. Their research focuses on the vaginal microbiome of African and Dutch women, and how vaginal microbiota are associated with sexually transmitted infections and the mucosal immune system. Hanneke Borgdorff uses bioinformatic and statistical techniques to analyse results from 16S rRNA genomics and human proteomics experiments, and incorporates the results into epidemiological analyses.

Thursday 24 March 2016, Hanneke successfully defended her PhD, called “The Vaginal Microbiome, associations with sexually transmitted infections and the mucosal immune response”.

Publications

  • Cervicovaginal microbiome dysbiosis is associated with proteome changes related to alterations of the cervicovaginal mucosal barrier

    Authored by:  Borgdorff H., Gautam R., Armstrong S. D., Xia D., Ndayisaba G. F., van Teijlingen N. H., Geijtenbeek T. B. H., Wastling J. M., van de Wijgert J. H. H. M.
    In: MUCOSAL IMMUNOLOGY [aheadofprint], 2016, p.‑.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26349657

  • Unique Insights in the Cervicovaginal Lactobacillus iners and L crispatus Proteomes and Their Associations with Microbiota Dysbiosis

    Authored by:  Borgdorff Hanneke, Armstrong Stuart D., Tytgat Hanne L. P., Xia Dong, Ndayisaba Gilles F., Wastling Jonathan M., van de Wijgert Janneke H. H. M.
    In: PLOS ONE 11(3), 2016, p.e0150767‑.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26963809

  • Vaginal high risk human papillomavirus infection in a cross sectional study among women of six different ethnicities in Amsterdam, the Netherlands: the HELIUS study.

    Authored by:  Alberts C. J., Vos R. A., Borgdorff H., Vermeulen W., van Bergen J., Bruisten S. M., Geerlings S. E., Snijder M. B., van Houdt R., Morré S. A., de Vries H. J. C., van de Wijgert J. H. H. M., Prins M. [= Maria], Schim van der Loeff M. F.
    In: SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS ‑, 2016, p.‑‑.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27188273

     

  • The vaginal microbiome: Associations with sexually transmitted infections and the mucosal immune response

    Authored by: Hanneke Borgdorff
    Thesis Universiteit van Amsterdam
    Promotor(s): J.H.H.M. van de Wijgert, T. van der Poll
    Copromotor(s): S.E. Geerlings
    Date of thesis defense: 24/03/2016

    A healthy vaginal microbiota is dominated by lactobacilli. Disturbance of the microbiological vaginal microbiota balance (“dysbiosis”) is associated with an increased risk of acquisition of sexually transmitted infections including HIV, and preterm birth in pregnant women. Since 2002, studies have used molecular methods to investigate the complex relationship between vaginal microbiota and vaginal health. This thesis first reviews the findings of these studies. Read more
  • Cervicovaginal microbiome dysbiosis is associated with proteome changes related to alterations of the cervicovaginal mucosal barrier.

    Authored by: Borgdorff H., Gautam R., Armstrong S. D., Xia D., Ndayisaba G. F., van Teijlingen N. H., Geijtenbeek T. B. H., Wastling J. M., van de Wijgert J. H. H. M.
    In: MUCOSAL IMMUNOLOGY , 2016, p.‑.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26349657

    This study examined the presence of vaginal Lactobacillus proteins among sex workers in Rwanda. “We looked at the relative abundance of Lactobacillus proteins, comparing women with a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal flora or microbiota to women with dysbiosis or disturbance of the vaginal flora or microbiota. Lactobacillus proteins may play important roles in maintaining a healthy Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota. Dysbiosis is associated with increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. During dysbiosis, the number of lactobacilli in the vagina decreases and a diverse mix of other bacteria becomes established. However, why dysbiosis happens in the first place remains largely unclear and currently there are no interventions available to help establish and maintain a Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota. We identified seven Lactobacillus iners proteins. Two glycolysis proteins and a ferritin-like protein from Lactobacillus iners were significantly associated with dominance of Lactobacillus iners, independent of vaginal pH or the abundance of Lactobacillus iners. A similar trend was seen for Lactobacillus crispatus proteins, but the number of women with a Lactobacillus crispatus-containing microbiota was smaller. These proteins might have important roles in maintaining a healthy Lactobacillus-dominated microbiota. Further study is needed to elucidate their function and their ability to prevent vaginal dysbiosis”.

  • Unique Insights in the Cervicovaginal Lactobacillus iners and L. crispatus Proteomes and their Associations with Microbiota Dysbiosis

    Authored by: Hanneke Borgdorff, Stuart D. Armstrong, Hanne L.P. Tytgat, Dong Xia, Gilles F. Ndayisaba, Jonathan M. Wastling, Janneke H. H. M. van de Wijgert
    In: PLoS One. 2016 Mar 10;11(3):e0150767
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26963809

  • Correlates of the molecular vaginal microbiota composition of African women

    Authored by: Raju Gautam, Hanneke Borgdorff, Vicky Jespers, Suzanna C Francis, Rita Verhelst, Mary Mwaura et al.
    In: BMC Infectious Diseases, 2015
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2334/15/86

  • The Impact of Hormonal Contraception and Pregnancy on Sexually Transmitted Infections and on Cervicovaginal Microbiota in African Sex Workers

    Authored by: Hanneke Borgdorff, Verwijs Marijn C., Wit F. W., Evgeni Tsivtsivadze, Ndayisaba Gilles François, Verhelst R., Frank H Schuren, van de Wijgert Janneke H.
    In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2015
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25668647
    http://journals.lww.com/stdjournal/Abstract/2015/03000/The_Impact_of_Hormonal_Contraception_and_Pregnancy.8.aspx

  • The vaginal microbiota: what have we learned after a decade of molecular characterization?

    Authored by: van de Wijgert J. H. H. M., Hanneke Borgdorff, Verhelst R., Crucitti Tania, Francis S., Verstraelen H., Jespers Vicky
    In: PloS One, 2014
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25148517
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0105998

  • Lactobacillus-dominated cervicovaginal microbiota associated with reduced HIV/STI prevalence and genital HIV viral load in African women

    Authored by: H. Borgdorff, Evgeni Tsivtsivadze, Rita Verhelst, Massimo Marzorati, Suzanne Jurriaans , Ndayisaba Gilles François, Frank H Schuren, Janneke van de Wijgert
    In: The ISME Journal, 2014, 6 March | doi:10.1038/ismej.2014.26
    http://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ismej201426a.html